Pennsylvania Historic Preservation

Blog of the Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Office

December 21, 2016
by Shelby Weaver Splain
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December’s SHPO Shout Out

I don’t want this month’s Shout Outs to get lost in the holiday shuffle of office parties, vacation days, and last-minute lunch-hour shopping trips so I’m bringing it to you a week early.  Consider it an early present from your … Continue reading

May 18, 2016
by Guest Contributor
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Community Landmarks in the City of Neighborhoods

By Samantha Kuntz Philadelphia has managed to accrue some significant historic resources over the past, oh, 300 years or so. It is home to no fewer than 550 resources (including districts) listed on National Register of Historic Places, and it … Continue reading

October 14, 2015
by Guest Contributor
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PA Modern: Discovering Pennsylvania’s Midcentury Architectural Legacy

by Beth Hager Eloquence in word and in visual expression – this is the exciting outcome of the new juried exhibit opening at The State Museum of Pennsylvania in Harrisburg on Sunday, October 25:  “PA Modern:  A Photography Exhibit of … Continue reading

Eliza Kirkbride School, Philadelphia

December 3, 2014
by Shelby Weaver Splain
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School Daze

No, this isn’t a review of Spike Lee’s 1988 movie.  I’m referring to my state of mind when I think about all of the work I’ve done with public schools in Philadelphia over the past few months. As you may … Continue reading

October 2, 2013
by Cory Kegerise
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Spotlight Series: National Alliance of Preservation Commissions

A major resource for these communities is the National Alliance of Preservation Commissions, the only national –level organization dedicated to serving the needs of local government preservation boards and commissions through education, advocacy, and training.


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January 2, 2013
by Cory Kegerise
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Uncommon Modern

Most communities in Pennsylvania have at least one bank that looks like a spaceship, or an office building with more glass and metal than brick and stone. The problem is that we often look past these buildings, rather than at them, and by doing that, we’re missing the incredible story they’re telling us about design and culture in the mid 20th Century.


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